How to Hire Nanny

Hiring a Nanny: The Step-by-Step Guide

As a new mom, I so wished that someone would have provided me with a step by step guide to hiring a nanny and Domestic Employer Rights and Wrongs. I didn’t have time to sift through the thousands of articles out there to try to figure it out. Not to mention, there is so much out there that is incorrect. I eventually figured it out. And I learned that, I myself, did a lot wrong. In creating Via The Village, I have found the credible sources. I am here to save you the trouble and break it down.

Before you set out on hiring a nanny, be sure the nanny option best suits your family. If budget is of concern, consider Nanny Sharing: An Innovative Option. Nanny sharing affords higher pay for the nanny while saving each family an average of 33%. Other common options include day care, an au pair, or a babysitter. To understand the differences, read more: Daycare, Nannies, Sitters, Oh My!

For some, a nanny is the clear choice since it keeps the child in the home and allows for a more intimate caregiver relationship than a group setting does. However, the search and hiring process can seem overwhelming. Not to worry. We have got you covered. Ensure all your bases are covered with this guide.

8 Steps of Hiring a Nanny

1. Understand the Current Going Rate—Learn the typical rate and compensation packages for a nanny in your area. This will  prepare you for budgeting and negotiations. The rate should not be less than the cost of living in your area. To understand a bit more on the cost of living in your area, check out livingwage.mit.edu. Read more: Domestic Employer Rights and Wrongs.

2. Allow Enough Time—Start your search about two months before desired start date. Keep in mind, some nannies may be out of work and looking to start immediately, while others are currently employed and need to give their present employer ample notice.

3. Set Your Criteria—Make a list of minimum the requirements a provider must meet. Also make a short list of qualities you desire in a care provider. Do you require the nanny to speak a certain language? Have a valid driver’s license? Being clear on things like this will guide your search and help you to articulate your needs from the start. This will increase your chances of choosing the best fit.

4. Narrow Down Your Choices—Qualities will need to be assessed in person. But before setting up an interview, pre screen your interview candidates to be sure they meet your minimum requirements. This pre screening will save everyone time. Also, ensure you and the provider are in agreement on the nanny tax topic.

5.  Interview—During an in-person interview, observe the candidates’s interaction with your children. In addition to asking questions, discuss compensation and also be sure to express details of the job and duties so expectations are clear from the start. Read more: Great Expectations: Nanny Responsibilities and Rate.

6. Do Your Homework—Once you have chosen a candidate, obtain permission to check references and run a background check and motor vehicle check.  

7. Get It in Writing—When you decide on your nanny candidate and settle negotiations, it is imperative to document it all on a nanny contract. This way all expectations, compensation package, and agreements will be clearly outlined. Having a contract will ensure all major points are understood and will minimize friction in the future if there is any difficulty recollecting points agreed upon. Via The Village provides nanny and nanny share contract templates. Read more: Domestic Employer Rights and Wrongs.

8. Be a Responsible Employer—Understand your obligations as a domestic employer. Add a rider to your homeowner’s insurance policy to cover anyone you employ in your home. Even for occasional babysitters, this is required by most insurance companies. For those who nanny share, discuss this unique situation with your insurance provider. Protect yourself and ensure anyone coming onto your property would be covered in case of injury. Read up on the basics at Domestic Employer Rights and Wrongs or for more extensive information, check out domesticemployers.org.